Lateness and Absenteeism

| February 17th, 2017 | No Comments »

In General, an employer has a reasonable expectation that employees will not be late for work on a regular basis and on time. If an employee is regularly absent without permission then, under the right circumstance, the employer may have grounds for a summary dismissal. With a summary dismissal, the employer is entitled to end the employment relationship and not be liable for notice pay.

Circumstances that warrant a summary dismissal for lateness may include instances where the employee was absent during a very important time, where the absence was deliberate after having received warnings from the employer regarding past absenteeism, and where the employer was prejudiced (or harmed) by the employee in their absence. A couple examples of the above are as follows:

If there is a very important 3-day sales event and the employer makes it clear to a key sales manager that his or her presence is necessary, a deliberate absence would probably grant the employer just cause for termination. In this example, the relevant factors are the importance of the event and the position of the sales person being managerial (a key role). An example of prejudice by an employee may be an instance where a request for vacation time was denied due to business reasons (short staff, busy time-period, etc.). In this instance, if an employee were to be absent during the time that was requested off, this could be cause for dismissal because the employee caused the employer harm, knowing that the time off was not granted.

With regards to lateness, the threshold for summary dismissal is higher. Lateness usually must hinder the employee from performing the essential duties of their job. Important factors to consider are whether the time was ever made-up by the employee, whether lateness is an ongoing issue, whether warnings were previously issued, the harm caused to the employer, and whether the lateness was the fault of the employee. A single lateness is unlikely to be cause for summary dismissal.

In considering termination for lateness and absenteeism, an employer must ensure that no human rights grounds are being violated. If an employee’s lateness or absenteeism is the result of illness, childcare obligations, or any other prohibited discriminatory grounds under the Ontario Human Rights Code, the employer must reasonably accommodate. In this instance, it is advised that employers seek legal advice as the duty to accommodate can be a complicated issue. Employees also should make employers aware if lateness or absenteeism is a result of illness, medical conditions, or childcare obligations as an employer cannot accommodate without knowledge of the situation.

Geographic Relocation and Constructive Dismissal

| February 17th, 2017 | No Comments »

Constructive dismissal is when an employer alters the fundamental conditions of the employment contract, which gives the employee little choice but to resign. Many employees do feel that relocation is constructive dismissal. The general rule for establishing constructive dismissal is whether the employment contract has been fundamentally changed. Relocation may be a fundamental change to the employment contract as displayed in past court cases. The following are a few factors to be aware of when deciding to seek representation by an employment lawyer.

It is important to be aware of whether relocation is an implied term of the employment contract as terms of the employment contract are often not in writing. ‘Implied’ terms are certain provision that should be reasonably assumed even though not formally written. In the case of a relocation request from an employer, the request may be implied in a number of circumstances. This includes whether the employer has relocated other workers in the past, whether the business is international (has many locations internationally), and the size of the organization. When the business is international and the position is not a demotion, it is generally seen as an implied condition of the employment contract and therefore not grounds for constructive dismissal.

Other factors to be aware of are whether the relocation is temporary, whether there are changes to other fundamental terms of the employment contract (such as pay and responsibilities), whether relocation expenses are being covered by the employer and whether undue hardship will result from the relocation. Further, the relocation must be done in good faith (i.e. for a legitimate business purpose). If you feel that a relocation request would be constructive dismissal for the reasons mentioned or any other factors, it is important to seek legal consultation from an employment law expert.

Courts have ruled against employers when relocation was not a term included in writing within an employment contract, even when the business was international with offices in other countries. For employers, it advisable to included relocation clauses in initial written employment contracts if this is a reasonable expectation given the nature of the company’s operation. For any uncertainties, seek the advice of an employment lawyer.

Tips for Legally Sound Termination Letter

| February 13th, 2017 | No Comments »

It is all too easy to write a termination letter that does not comply with the law.  Here are some common pitfalls and tips for ensuring that your termination letter is legally sound:

  • Tip #1 – Consider whether you may be using out-of-date precedent: This one is most common.  Sometimes employers use and reuse the same termination letter for years.  While the letter was drafted by a lawyer at one point in time, it has not been reviewed by a lawyer in years.  Employment laws have changed in the meantime, and the termination letter has become unlawful.  If your company uses a precedent termination letter, have your employment lawyer review it at least once a year.
  •  Tip #2 – Ensure that the letter states that the employee is being provided with at least the minimum requirements under the Employment Standards Act, 2000: If the employee’s employment is terminated without cause, they must be provided with a specific amount of notice of termination, and, if applicable, severance pay.  If the termination letter provides less termination and severance pay than what the Employment Standards Act, 2000 says the employee should get, it may be unlawful.  Be aware that even employees who are paid solely on the basis of commission are entitled to termination pay.  Similarly, if the termination letter does not provide for the employee’s benefits to continue during the time period that they receive termination pay, it may be illegal.
  •  Tip #3 – Provide Valid Consideration: If you are asking the employee to sign a legal release on or after termination, you must offer them something that more than just the termination and severance pay that they are otherwise entitled to under the Employment Standards Act, 2000.   You cannot offer an employee something that they already entitled under the law in exchange for their signature on a release.  You must offer something them something in addition to their existing legal entitlements.
  •  Tip #4 – Do not Attempt to Rely on an Employment Contract that is Invalid: Often, in a termination letter, an employer will reference an employment contract signed years ago, such as a termination provision limiting the employee’s entitlements on termination. For the same reason as Tip #1, above, you should ensure that the contract language that you want to repeat in your termination letter is still legally valid. Some common termination provisions found in older employment contracts have been deemed invalid and inapplicable in recent court decisions.
  •  Tip #5 – Be Careful when Alleging a Reason for the Termination: If the termination is without cause, there is no general requirement for an employer to provide a reason for the termination.  However, if the termination is with cause, you generally must provide a reason.  It is important to get the exact reason for a with-cause termination right.  If you terminate an employee’s employment for cause for a reason that turns out to be false or flimsy, they could sue for additional damages on that basis.

If you have questions about writing a legally sound termination letter, or if you think that your termination letter is unlawful, contact one of the lawyers at Whitten & Lublin for assistance.

 

Author: Simone Ostrowski, Whitten & Lublin

Can an Employer Terminate an Employee Charged But Not Yet Convicted of a Criminal Offence?

| January 23rd, 2017 | No Comments »

An employer may be concerned about damaging their reputation by continuing to employ an individual that has been charged with a criminal offence. This may especially be the case if the employer is known to be involved with the community in which it operates its business. In trying to establish whether there is just cause for termination, a court looks at the following:

  • The amount of responsibility the employee has in relation to his/her duties
  • The degree to which the company’s reputation in the community may be harmed
  • Whether the accusation involved the use of company equipment

To illustrate, the case of Kelly v Linamar (Ontario Supreme Court of Justice) speaks to the above listed points quite well.

Kelly supervised 10-12 employees, managed deliveries and was in contact with customers on a regular basis. Linamar is located in Guelph, Ont., a small town of about 100 000 residents. Linamar had a great reputation in Guelph, especially with its contributions to children for educational donations, sponsoring many youth sports teams and assisting local schools in educational initiatives. Kelly was charged with possession of child pornography at the time he was employed by Linamar and the local media identified Kelly as an employee of Linamar.

Linamar terminated Kelly before he was convicted of this criminal offense and the court found the termination was justified. Considering the points above, Linamar was justified in terminating Kelly because:

The amount of responsibility the employee has in relation to duties:

Kelly was a supervisor and was in constant contact with customers. The fact that the community was aware of the charges against Kelly due to the local press made this a concern for Linamar and its brand.

The degree to which the company’s reputation in the community may be harmed:

Given that the charges dealt with allegations concerning children, this directly conflicted with the image Linamar had in the community. Linamar made efforts to positively impact the children of the Guelph community. Given the press releases and Kelly’s interaction with customers within the Guelph community, Kelly’s continued employment definitely posed a threat to Linamar’s reputation. This was the most significant factor in this case.

Whether the accusation involved the use of company equipment

Kelly did not use company computers to commit the alleged acts. Had he done so, this would undoubtedly be enough for termination.

This case illustrated the three key factors to be determined if employers are considering terminating an employee for being charged criminally for acts committed outside of the workplace. It is important to understand that such decisions should be made with careful consideration of all the factors. The unique facts of each case must be considered because an employee being charged with a crime that is morally reprehensible, such as the one described, does not on its own grant an employer cause to terminate an employee without compensation (notice pay).  Please seek the advice of an employment law expert if faced with a similar situation.

How To Choose the Best Wrongful Termination Lawyers

| January 18th, 2017 | No Comments »

wrongful terminationYou have questions about your wrongful termination, but how can you find a wrongful termination lawyer you can trust?

Do your research.  Like all service-based industries, it pays to spend some time and effort researching potential wrongful termination lawyers.

What to look for? Look for a wrongful termination lawyer who practices exclusively in employment, human rights and/or labour law, and licensed to practice in the jurisdiction in which you work or reside.  You probably do not want to entrust your case to a general practitioner as employment law is nuanced and changes frequently.

Look for someone who is regularly interviewed, published, and does speaking engagements with reputable organizations.  That way you are sure to find a wrongful termination lawyer who is up to date on the state of the law.

You may also wish to speak with someone certified by the Law Society of Upper Canada as an expert in the field.

Ask around.  Talk to friends, relatives, anyone who has experience with a wrongful termination lawyer. Get their impressions of the lawyer, the firm, their fees, and what their overall experience was like.

Beware of wrongful termination lawyers who want to meet with you for free.  Often you get what you pay for and these wrongful termination lawyers may just be fishing for lucrative cases.

Feel free to get a second opinion or meet with a few lawyers at different firms until you find the right wrongful termination lawyer for you and you case.

Finding a lawyer and a firm that you are comfortable with is key as a successful case depends on trust and communication between lawyer and client.

 

Author: Ellen Low, Whitten & Lublin

Employee Duty to Mitigate Damages After Being Terminated

| January 18th, 2017 | No Comments »

Being terminated from employment can be an emotional and impassioned time but it is important that employees remain mindful of their duty to mitigate damages. This simply means that an employee must make the necessary efforts to lessen their losses and, in turn, the amount of damages the employer is obligated to pay. In court, employees are required to initially show that they have taken reasonable steps to mitigate damages.

The duty to mitigate requires the employee to accept a comparable position if offered by the employer providing the working environment has not turned hostile. As established by past court cases, this offer may be made immediately or after some time has passed. The offer, however, must be a position that is comparable and not one that leads to embarrassment or loss of status. In determining whether a position is comparable, factors usually include wage/salary, location, status, and training. Employees must also seek and accept comparable offers of employment from other employers. If it is proven that a comparable position was offered by another employer and it was turned down, employees may not be entitled to damages from their previous employer.

If an employer challenges the employee’s efforts in mitigating damages, they must go beyond just proving that there was an availability of comparable jobs during that time. The employer must also show that the employee had a reasonable chance at obtaining such positions and that the employee failed to pursue the employment opportunities.

There are many other factors that can influence the amount owed in damages depending on the complexity of the situation. Such factors may include retraining and career changes, the decision for the employee to pursue their own business and so forth. It is thus important to speak to a legal expert to clear up any uncertainties and to ensure the amount paid in damages is fair.

What age discrimination looks like in the workplace

| January 11th, 2017 | No Comments »

“We do not want to invest in someone who will retire so soon.”

“Perhaps you would benefit from working with people your own age.”

“We prefer to maintain our youthful culture.”

“We prefer to hire more mature employees.”

What do all of these statements have in common? In each one, the speaker is drawing a distinction between the recipient of the statement, and those of a different age group, which negatively affects the recipient.  In the workplace, this can amount to discrimination on the basis of age, or “ageism”.

Age discrimination in the workplace is illegal, and all employees over the age of 18 (with limited exceptions) benefit from the anti-discrimination provisions of federal and Ontario human rights legislation.

Age discrimination can occur anytime an employee is unfairly distinguished because of his or her age.  Ageism does not need to be overt, or plain and obvious, in order to constitute discrimination.  In fact, ageism is quite often subtle, and done without malice or realization that ageism is occurring.

For example, an employer may want to maintain a certain culture that is more prevalent amoung younger generations, thereby denying employment to a senior applicant in the process.  While the employer’s intent may have been innocent, the consequence is that an older job applicant has been unfairly denied employment for no reason other than his or her date of birth.

Similarly, an employer’s desire to maintain a more mature workplace may inadvertently hold younger employees to higher standards in order to obtain employment.  The employer’s intent may be sincere, but the way in which prospective employees are vetted may not be.

Here are some important things both employers and employees should remember in order to avoid age discrimination:

  • Employers cannot deny a benefit or opportunity (such as employment, promotions, raises, etc.) to an employee that is in anyway motivated by the employee’s age
  • Mandatory retirement after a certain age is illegal
  • Even though laws dealing with age discrimination only apply to employees over 18 years of age, employers are still bound by their duties of good faith and fair dealing in connection with their younger employees
  • Anti-age discrimination laws apply not only during employment, but during the application and screening process as well.

Author: Marc Kitay, Employment Lawyer

Inducement of an Employee: Risks and Damages

| January 9th, 2017 | No Comments »

Inducement: When pursuing an employee that works for another company, it is important to be mindful that this employee would be sacrificing a number of employment benefits by leaving their employer. This generally includes seniority, potential career advancements with their former employer, job security, benefits and so on. If recruiters are very persistent and aggressive towards an employee of another organization, or use promises such as career advancement, security, or higher pay, then this will be seen as inducement. The law seeks to protect individuals being induced by holding employers liable if the employee is terminated unjustly or too quickly. Thus, when recruiters focus on attracting talent from another organization, employers should be aware of the potential risks.

Risk 1: Increased damages through notice pay

This is problematic an unjust dismissal or constructive dismissal claim. In these circumstances, the employer will owe the employee pay for damages through increased notice pay as a result of the inducement. (Notice pay are damages owed to place the employee in a similar position had he/she not been terminated).

Risk 2: Damages for Misrepresentation (moving costs)

Another concern for employers should be whether the inducement was accompanied by a misrepresentation of the employment offer. The key is to be completely honest about the available position. If certain promises are made, such as advancement, but it is known that such promises are only possible with a budgetary approval, this information must be given before the candidate is hired. If a misrepresentation is made, the employer will be liable for any moving costs the employee incurred in addition to the amount owed through increased notice pay. Of course, this is only an issue if the employee is terminated undeservingly (i.e. termination without just cause) or too quickly. Nonetheless, employers should take the necessary steps to ensure their recruiters are fairly representing employment opportunities to potential candidates.

Factors used to Determine if Inducement Occurred

If the employer is able to show that the employee was not induced or if the employment lasted several years, then it is less likely that damages will be awarded. In summary, some of the factors to determine whether inducement occurred are:

  1. Whether the former job was secure
  2. Whether the employee accepted the offer while there were other better offers available
  3. Whether the employee had to move as a result of accepting the position
  4. Whether the employee was an owner of a business prior to inducement

If you are an employee and feel you have been induced and now find yourself unemployed after a short period, please contact an employment law expert to ensure you are compensated fairly. Employers are also encouraged to seek legal advice for any concerns regarding the risks mentioned above.

Important Additions in a Severance Package

| December 21st, 2016 | No Comments »

severance package calculateThe purpose of a severance package is to make a terminated employee “whole” over a reasonable period of time.  Very commonly, severance packages include only base salary, neglecting other elements of compensation – such as benefits, RRSP or pension contributions, bonuses, commissions, and so forth.  If a severance package excludes any of these elements, the employee ought to speak with an employment lawyer.

Sometimes, the missing elements of severance packages are subtle.  For example, many benefit schemes include more than just health and dental coverage – they also often include life insurance, long-term disability coverage, critical illness, a health spending account, and the like.  Each of these items has a dollar value – whether it’s the company’s cost or the replacement cost.  Where the severance package offers health and dental continuation and nothing further, the extra cost of these missing items needs to be accounted for in some other way in order to make you “whole”.

Bonuses are also a major bone of contention in severance package negotiations.  The Ontario courts have been very clear recently that bonuses which would have been earned during the severance period must be included in a severance arrangement, unless the company has communicated very clear language to the contrary through its bonus plans and/or employment contracts.  Employees ought to remember that in severance negotiations there are often two different bonus issues: 1) the bonus earned during the year of the termination; and 2) the bonus which would have been earned if not for the termination.  Both these elements are up for negotiation.

Finally, it is very common to negotiate non-monetary items into a severance package, such as a reference letter, employment transition counselling, and reeducation allowances.  Although companies generally do not have to offer these items, some companies include them anyway, if they feel it could provide value to the departing employee.

 

Author: Daniel Chodos, Employment Lawyer

Employees’ Wrongful Actions and Employers’ Liability

| December 20th, 2016 | No Comments »

wrongful actionsEmployers may be found liable for the wrongful actions of their employees under certain conditions. The wrong must be tortious – this is a wrongful action that can be brought to civil court – which includes torts such as trespassing, assault, theft, negligence and so forth. There are certain factors established by the courts in determining whether the employer is vicariously liable for the wrongful act(s) of their employee. These factors are analyzed thought the ‘Salmond’ test established by common law.

Salmond Test – Vicarious Liability

The ‘Salmond’ test seeks to establish whether the employer created an opportunity for the employee to commit the wrongful action through the duties required for the position. If the act was related to such duties, then the employer can be found liable. The test seeks to analyze the following:

  • The opportunity the employer gave the employee
  • The extent to which the wrongful act may have furthered the employer’s aims (i.e. making this action more likely to be committed by the employee)
  • The extent to which the wrongful act was related to friction, confrontation or intimacy inherent to the position/business
  • The power conferred on the employee in relation to the victim
  • The vulnerability of the victims in relation to the employee’s power

In general terms, the principle underlying the ‘Salmond’ test is whether the duties required gave an enhanced opportunity for actions of wrongdoing. This can be examined though a combination of the above factors in the ‘Salmond’ test. Employers are encouraged to seek an employment law expert for a full understanding of any situation raising concern. The above is by no means comprehensive.

An example that illustrates the relevant principles is Bazley v. Curry (SCC 1999). This case established that vicarious liability extends to enterprise risk. Simply, this can be viewed as the necessary duties employees are given to conduct business in the specific industry. This means that employers can be found liable for the risks inherent in the job itself, and not just acts that are authorized by the employer.

Bazley v Curry Example

In Bazley v. Curry, the employer was a child care facility. Employees here were caretakers of mentally disabled children. The nature of this business required caregivers to have a relationship of total intervention – bathing, preparing children for bed, and so on. Mr. Curry was the caregiver and Bazley was the child subjected to abuse by Mr. Curry. The employer here was found to be vicariously liable for the wrongdoing. In simple terms, this was because Mr. Curry was put in a position that made the abuse more likely when examining the duties of the job. The focus here is on the enterprise risk.  The nature of the business made these actions by Mr. Curry more likely to occur; the employer was therefore vicariously liable.

Final Thoughts

The courts place an increased responsibility on employers for the actions of their employees for two reasons. The employer has the means to compensate potential victims for the wrongdoing of their employees. Also, the court recognizes the employer’s ability to deter their employees from committing such wrongful acts. This may include performing criminal background tests or placing third-party supervision as deemed necessary for the position and enterprise, as this will mitigate risk and deter employee wrongdoing. It is important for employers to be diligent and take the necessary precautions to prevent wrongful actions by employees.