An Impassioned Employee Storms Out of the Office: Is This Resignation?

| Tuesday, March 28th, 2017 | No Comments »

When an employee resigns there is usually clear actions that support their decision. This may include a written letter, a verbal statement, a notice period, information that the employee has found another position or is moving away, or so forth. The idea is that there are clear indicators that leave no doubt about the intentions of the employee to resign. However, suppose that an employee is extremely upset from an event or changes made in the workplace, and storms off and leaves suggestions that may point to a resignation. The key is to be mindful of the surrounding circumstances and following up with the employee when coming to a reasonable conclusion regarding their true intentions. To get a better sense of what this entails, a recent case of Rajinder Joha (plaintiff) vs. Simmons da Silva LLP (defendant) by the Ontario Superior Court will be reviewed below.

Rajinder Joha was a senior law clerk for Simmons da Silva LLP (Simmons). Mrs. Joha was 62 years of age and was with Simmons for 27 years.

Mrs. Jona was informed by Mr. Clark (the lawyer she worked under) of structural changes, which included Mrs. Joha being under the direction of another employee that she did not get along with, on June 3rd, 2015. The next day, Mrs. Joha claimed to have heard Mr. Clark tell another law clerk that this person was to work with Mr. Clark, which further upset Mrs. Joha. After claiming to have overhear this, Mrs. Joha removed her personal belongings from her desk and handed in her security pass to Mr. Clark. Mrs. Joha did not return to work or contact any human resource personnel from June 4th – June 8th 2015. On Tuesday June 9th, Mrs. Joha attempted to return to work after having time to think things through and obtain advice from a lawyer. However, the employer refused to allow her back, claiming she had resigned. Mrs. Joha then sought damages for wrongful dismissal.

The judge ultimately decided that in consideration of the surrounding circumstances, Mrs. Joha did not resign from her position and was entitled to damages. The key takeaway from this case is that when an employee resigns or leaves during a time of heated emotions, the employer must consider the surrounding circumstances in determining if the employee did in fact resign. In this case, the judge considered Mrs. Joha’s tenure, senior position, her age, her lack of secured alternative employment, the fact that this was out of character for Mrs. Joha, and a lack of written notice by Mrs. Joha as circumstances that indicated Mrs. Johna did not resign. Further, the employer’s actions were also considered. There was no attempt by anyone at the firm to contact Mrs. Joha regarding her suspected resignation, no follow up meeting by her boss Mr. Clark, and no attempt to discuss the matter. The employer’s inaction was an important factor here in the judge’s decision. As a result, the employer was liable for damages of wrongful dismissal.

Employers that are faced with a similar situation should always make an attempt to follow up with the employee. This should include contacting the employee to discuss the matter, an attempt to make a follow-up meeting, or a written letter to confirm the employee’s intention to resign. Employers should be mindful that a cooling off period may be necessary so that emotions do not interfere with an employee’s judgement or decision. It is best to seek legal advice from an employment law expert when in doubt to avoid unnecessary litigation.

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