Fixed Term Contracts: To include or not to include a termination clauses

| Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 | No Comments »

Often, the most cost effective way to fulfill a temporary business need is to hire an individual on a fixed term contract. However, what may not be known to most employers is if the employment contract comes to a premature end, then the employee would legally be owed the amount for the remainder of the contract. The way to avoid this outcome is to include a termination clause in the employment contract.

When including a termination clause there are a few options available to employers. Employers may opt to include a reasonable notice provision, which would entitle the employee common law notice. At common law, notice periods are usually longer than those provided by minimal standards employment legislation, as factors such as age, tenure, skill level, responsibilities and so on will be factored in to the length of the notice pay. However, they are easier to draft and less likely to be found unenforceable due to errors of law.

Alternatively, employers may opt to provide the minimum notice period under law. However, due to recent common law developments (see Wood v. Deeley Imports Ltd., 2017, ONCA), employers must be very careful when drafting clauses that seek to provide for the mandatory minimum. For instance, payments for notice, benefits and severance cannot be grouped into a lump sum payment. The clause must specify the amount for each requirement of severance pay under the law. Otherwise, the clause is unenforceable and essentially non-existent.  The wording is key and thus more susceptible to legal error. It is always best to seek the service of an employment lawyer when seeking this option.

Overall, it is best to include a termination clause for a fixed term contract, as this will ensure the goal of cost effectiveness. It is important to seek the assistance of an employment law expert when implementing termination clauses.  The onus on employers to draft clear, unambiguous and legally compliant termination clauses is high, and any errors will render the clause unenforceable.

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