When is Domestic Violence an Issue of Workplace Health and Safety

| August 1st, 2017 | No Comments »

It may not be well known, but there are instances where domestic violence is an issue of workplace health and safety. There is situation, therefore, where it is the employer’s responsibility to make sure an employee that is a victim of domestic violence is safe while at work. Violence may take many forms, as domestic violence is an attempt to gain power or control over a person with whom one has an intimate relationship. This may take many forms, such as texting, email, phone or stalking.

Where domestic violence is between two current employees, the employer has an unquestionable responsibility to ensure that the victim is free from violence while at work. This may include modifying tasks to ensure that the individuals do not cross each other during the course of work, limiting or eliminating communication between the employees involved, or even termination if it is impossible to ensure the victim’s safety and well being. In essence, domestic violence, in this case, would be viewed equally to workplace violence and should elicit the same response from the employer.

In the instance that the aggressor is not an employee, the employer still has a responsibility to ensure that the employee is safe while at work. This may include screening the employee’s calls, providing a photo of the abuser to security and reception, notifying security personnel in in case the aggressor appears at the workplace, ensuring that immediate help is called upon if physical contact is attempted at work, and providing a personal work plan to assist the victim. It is also important to ensure that the employee is safe during their route home after work, as the abuser may anticipate contact during this time. Allow the employee to express their concerns so that a meaningful plan may be developed.

Under the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act, employers are required to implement domestic violence policy and have a plan in place to minimize the impact of domestic violence if it becomes workplace issues. The program should include training to identify indicators, methods of reporting, educational materials and so forth. It is in the employers best interest to have an effective policy that goes beyond minimal requirements, as domestic violence may impact job performance, attendance, and workplace morale. Contact an employment law expert to ensure that workplace policies regarding domestic violence are current, and prevention programs are properly in place.