Health and Safety: Can a Corporation be held Criminally Negligent for the Conduct of Supervisors?

| April 11th, 2017 | No Comments »

Upon other employer duties relevant to health and safety, the duty to provide competent supervisors may be the most important. An employer may have all the requirements of a safe workplace, however, having a supervisor that is negligent may result in criminal charges against the business resulting in sever fines. Criminal negligence charges are for extreme cases such as the one below.

R. v. Metron Construction Corporation

The case of R. v. Metron Construction Corporation (Metron) is an important case to be aware of and also a sad one. In this case, Metron was given a project of restructuring the balconies of several high-rise buildings. The president of the company hired a project manager, whom then hired a supervisor for the workers on site. Swing-stage scaffolding was needed for the workers to work on the buildings’ exterior balconies. Life lines were required to be worn by each worker and were attached to each swing-stage, ensuring any falls wouldn’t result in injury or death. The supervisor was responsible for insuring that safety procedures were followed.

The company ordered additional swing-stage scaffolding that did not have proper labels for maximum capacity as required under the Ontario Health and Safety Act (OHSA). On December 24th, 2009, 6 workers including the supervisor boarded onto a swing-stage to travel to the 14th floor. The normal practice is for only 2 individuals to be on a swing-stage at once. The combined weight led to the collapse of the swing-stage, leading to 4 deaths (including the supervisor). There were only 2 life lines available on the swing-stage, only one of which was used properly – the worker that properly used the lifeline was uninjured and the other that used it improperly was injured. The use of a lifeline is also a regulation required by the OHSA. A report concluded that the combined weight and the faulty design of the swing-stage was the reason for the collapse. Further, had all workers used lifelines, the deaths would be prevented. A toxicology report also revealed that workers were under the influence of marijuana, including the supervisor.

Decision:

Metron was found criminally negligent under the Criminal Code for the conduct of the supervisor. This was due to the degree of blameworthiness and severity of the accident. Specifically, the departure from the 2-person limit norm, the improper use of lifelines, workers being under the influence of marijuana, and the fact that the supervisor allowed all this to take place were all factors leading to this decision. The fine was set at $750 000, from the initial $200 000 in order to denunciate and deter such negligence that place workers in danger.

Takeaway:

Corporations can be found criminally negligent for the actions of anyone in a supervisory role. Specifically, the court maintained that the seriousness and the corresponding penalty is not to be diminished by the fact that the negligence was the fault of the supervisor rather than a more prominent figure of the company. It is therefore important for human resource and health and safety professionals to be aware of the importance of having competent and diligent supervisors responsible for the health and safety of workers. Employers must ensure that supervisors are properly trained and that all standards are followed so that unnecessary accidents are avoided. Training, inspections, workplace policy and proper lines of communication should all be used as a means of maintaining high standards of health and safety. In addition, any violations by supervisors should be dealt with in a serious manner with discipline imposed accordingly. If there are any concerns in your workplace regarding health and safety policy and compliance, please seek the advice of an employment lawyer.

Medical Marijuana Use in a Safety Sensitive Workplace: Can an Employer Deny an Employee Use?

| March 13th, 2017 | No Comments »

Medical marijuana may be prescribed for several medical reasons. Under human rights law in Ontario, workers have a right not to be discriminated against on the grounds of ‘disability’ which encompasses illness. The use of medicinal marijuana in the workplace must be treated the same as any other prescription drug that a worker uses for a medical condition. In order to use medicinal marijuana in the workplace, the employee must provide medical documentation stating the nature of the disability (reason for use), and whether he/she is able to safely work while using medicinal marijuana while requesting accommodation.

Under human rights law, employers must accommodate an employee with a disability up to the point of ‘undue hardship’. In safety sensitive workplaces, accommodation may present increased challenges for employers. Under occupational health and safety law, workers cannot be a threat to their own safety or the safety of others within the workplace. An employer must, therefore, balance the duty to accommodate and the need to maintain a safe working environment.

There is no blanket standard that can be applied with regards to accommodation of medicinal marijuana use in safety sensitive workplaces. Each case must be examined in relation to the worker’s needs, the work duties and organization of work, and other factors that may have an effect on accommodation. For instance, the interconnectedness of work roles on an assembly line may present greater difficulties in terms of granting a worker the time needed to take prescribed usage of marijuana. If usage requires inhalation, then the worker must be relieved by another available worker that can perform the same role. This is because inhalation must be done in a designated smoking area. Accommodation efforts in this hypothetical may raise question such as: can other workers that can perform the same role be made available at all times? Can the marijuana be taken by ingestion with food while on the assembly line? Does being under the influence raise a health and safety concern? Can this worker be retrained for other similar roles that would alleviate potential health and safety and/or accommodation issues? With regards to the worker’s ability to perform the job duties without any concern for health and safety while under the influence, the worker’s physician must provide documentation showing that there are no issues.

The above was only one of many different scenarios that may arise. Employers are advised to have sufficient workplace policies with regards to prescription medication and workplace safety. This includes having procedures for reporting the use of medicinal marijuana and requesting accommodation, proper procedures for using medicinal marijuana when needed, and defining what is considered impairment with regards to health and safety matters. This is by no means a comprehensive guide. The consultation of an employment law expert should be sought so that unnecessary and costly future litigation is avoided for failing to accommodate up to ‘undue hardship’.

Know your rights: Health and Safety regulations take a more prominent role in the workplace

| June 28th, 2012 | No Comments »

Though many of us know that there are provincial regulations regarding health and safety in our workplace, few realize what those specific rights and regulations are.  Knowing and understanding your rights at work is the first step in ensuring both employers and employees have a safe work environment.  Understanding the situations in which these rules can be enforced not only protects employees, but it protects employers from many potential legal issues.

The Ontario Ministry of Labour (MOL) is working to help ensure these rights are better known to workers and employers alike.  Following a recommendation by the Expert Advisory Panel on workplace safety, the MOL has released a poster outlining the rights and responsibilities of workers and their employers which, by law, must now be displayed in the workplace.  This was done as part of an effort to streamline and clarify sec. 25(1)(i) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act which requires employers to post material in the workplace explaining the Act.

The one-page poster, called “Health and Safety at work – Prevention Starts Here”, outlines workers’ health and safety rights and responsibilities as well as the responsibilities of employers and supervisors.  It highlights that employers must not take action against their workers for raising concerns or, in certain cases, refusing to work if they feel their right to safe work environment is being violated.  It encourages workers to become involved in health and safety at their work and includes a toll-free number for the MOL with instructions about why and when to contact the MOL.

The MOL inspectors will begin enforcing the requirement to display the poster on October 1, 2012, but employers and employees shouldn’t wait to post it, or to familiarize themselves with the regulations.  The poster is available in 17 different languages and can be downloaded from the MOL website here.