When is a non-solicitation clause not enough?

| August 11th, 2017 | No Comments »

Non-solicitation clauses prohibit an employee from actively pursuing clients of the employer when the employment relation has ended. To be enforceable, the clause must have a time limit that is reasonable. Spatial limitation (or a geographical scope) in a non-solicitation clause is becoming less common and less necessary due to the advancements of telecommunications technology and organization of service work. Overall, any restriction that goes beyond an employer’s business assets will be deemed unenforceable.

Non-solicitation clauses are usually all that is necessary to protect an employer and their assets from an employee that resigns. In exceptional circumstances, however, employers may instead need to use a non-competition clause to protect their business. Non-compete clauses prevent an employee from pursuing employment in the same or similar capacity once the employment relation has been terminated. in other words, they are not allowed to compete against their former employer. Non-competition clauses must have a defined geographic and time limit to be enforceable. These limits must be clearly stated as any ambiguity will render the clause unenforceable. Courts are also reluctant to enforce non-competition clauses because it limits the employee’s ability to earn a living. This is why only under exceptional circumstances will a non-competition clause be enforceable.

Exceptional circumstances are usually for employees that occupy key senior or managerial roles with very close relations with customers or trade secrets that would severely hurt the employer’s business if the employee left to a competitor. With regards to clients, exceptional circumstance would entail a relationship with clients that is to the exclusion of anyone else. This means that the employee, in the eyes of the client, essentially is the business. Under such circumstances, an employee leaving to a competitor would likely result in former clients following the employee without being solicited. In such instances, a non-compete clause would be necessary to protect an employer’s business.

Overall, non-compete clauses must only be used when necessary. When conditions warrant a non-compete clause, the clause must be carefully drafted, as any ambiguity will render the clause unenforceable. It is important that employers seek the advice of an employment lawyer when considering a non-compete clause as such instances are rare and need legal expert analysis