Can A Manager be Disciplined for After-Hours Conduct of Sexual Harassment?

| June 20th, 2017 | No Comments »

It may be commonly perceived that unacceptable conduct in relation the workplace only extends as far as the physical workplace or workplace events. Although questionable in certain circumstances, when the misconduct involves sexual harassment and is perpetrated by a managerial figure, prohibited workplace conduct may extend beyond the workplace itself to protect employees from unwanted and offensive conduct.

A case that illustrates the above is Simpson v. Consumers’ Association of Canada (OCA 2001). Simpson was an Executive Director for Consumers’ Association and was terminated for sexual harassment. The allegations against Mr. Simpson include propositioning a secretary, going to a strip club with a co-worker, having an open sexual affair with an assistant causing her to resign, and inviting workers to his cottage to swim unclothed among other things. Consumers’ Association terminated Simpson upon discovering the allegations and misconduct. Simpson then claimed unjust dismissal.

Simpson did apologize for the conduct in the workplace and claimed that the other misconduct happened outside of the workplace. However, the court found that there were workplace connections to the misconduct that took place outside of the workplace events. The court stated that sexual harassment is an objective standard which includes conduct that ought to reasonably be known as unwelcome. Given Simpson’s position in the company, he should have known his conduct was unwelcome and would receive adverse consequences. It is also important to note that the absence of sexual harassment policy in this workplace did not work in Simpson’s favour. Being in an executive position, sexual harassment policy could have easily been implemented by Simpson. This reaffirms the courts position on zero tolerance on sexual harassment absent of workplace sexual harassment policy.

Overall, sexual harassment perpetrated by an individual in a managerial position outside the workplace will have consequences. The fact that the conduct occurs outside the workplace does not protect managers or senior personnel from workplace discipline. The objective standard adopted by the courts ensures that sexual harassment by a managerial figure will not be tolerated outside the workplace, as this ought to be known to be unwelcome behaviour and could be subject to consequences.  If subjected to sexual harassment outside the workplace, it is always important to make the appropriate personnel aware and seek legal advice.